Carla Harris

Series Entry 12.1


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”

I’m made of water like you’re made

.

of water and our shirts are see-through

and made to cut clouds. In the grass

.

you are a cloud.

.

In the grass I am just like you.

Let’s cool the air

.

and see what happens.

.

Let’s cry

.

out until we’re spitting at the sky.

.

That cloud would be for you.

That cloud would be for you.

That cloud would be for you.


A. Minetta Gould

Series Entry 12.2


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”


Carla Harris

Series Entry 12.3


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”

When we’re like water, I bet we’re locked

in a window’s cells

.

waiting for their stillness to release.

When we’re like water,

.

we’ll watch trees’ veins

melt toward color, we’ll nap in warmth;

.

we’ll nap in warmth.

There’s something going

.

blind over us, it feels rushing

& bright, we’re still moving.


A. Minetta Gould

Series Entry 12.4


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”


Carla Harris

Series Entry 12.5


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”

The sun fades us.

It pulls our air out and dares to wake us.

Today I’m cold & you’re not.

I have pain in my lungs & you’re not.

You’re not responding to color or my palms.

How still can we be?

Will you watch sleep stop again?

Until when can our joints rest?


A. Minetta Gould

Series Entry 12.6


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”


Carla Harris

Series Entry 12.7


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”

What of the air between the panes, it’s stale

.

life I’d die for

.

much like

the weight

of your arms.

.

It’s noon & I’m done thinking

.

about time, how it’s lapsed, how it’s nose bleeds.

.

We said we wanted

to be human beings again,

it being Spring & all,

.

our break blocked by a bad paint job, or a stranger,

.

or, quite simply, the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.


A. Minetta Gould

Series Entry 12.8


Description

Series_12

Carla Harris & A. Minetta Gould

Nature acts as a cipher. From it we hope to divine certain meanings that seem key to understanding both our individual selves and relationships with others. But, as Carl Harris (photography) and A. Minetta Gould (poetry) encounter in Series 12, the elemental forces of our surroundings do not allow easy apprehension of their significance. This becomes painfully apparent when such romantic investigations serve as mere pretense for discovering deeper truths about the human condition, or as misguided means for metaphorically distilling and interpreting the connections we long to share with those we love. More disorienting still, the violet cloud mass afloat at dusk or outdoor vista gazed from behind the framed window can reflect the very patterns of isolation and ambivalence that seekers hope to dispel when confiding “I’m made of water like you’re made.” As acutely stated in one of Gould’s pieces, the lone speaker finally and ironically recognizes “the weather’s form that refuses to leave us.”

 

Through Harris’s attention to sharply balancing the serene and shadowed aspects of her photographed subjects, combined with Gould’s poems struggling with inscrutable atmosphere and consolations of “stale air”, Series 12 asks “when can our joints rest?” of the erosive forces providing, if not as expected, a way “to be human beings again.”