On thorns, on thighs. On waitresses.

On glue and glass. Admirers, gossips,

disfigurement. The parenthetic ear.

The alley bleeding. The cure in the

ending. Uneventful lover. A dead

mob. A dead spy. She would call me

“Clit Puppy” and sneer. A cage made of

fur. Ohm bathtub. Debris injected

back into the bomb. The antidote

in the babble. He is called “Baptism of

Thunderstorms.” The Most Purred.

A bag of oxygen. Freemason

having a stroke. Devious pupa.

Kimberly. Drizzles. Nymphs. Privacies.

The ashes of a wolf. Force-fed.

Arsonist and bookseller. Inside the

hydrant, a placenta, a snake. Called

my local monastery. The discovery

of science. Sunset. The Monitored

Sexline. The Headphone Dividend.

Stationmaster’s phone charger,

neighbors, outlines of the sunflower.

Of a method for chewing fingerprints.

Of the publication of the Enemy. Of

gratitude. Of the thorn in the tone.

Of the tattoo against her lip.


Donald Dunbar

Series Entry 14.1


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”


Michael Matchen

Series Entry 14.2


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”

Kimberly plays the arsonist

and most in the theatre melt

in their helplessness, in their seats,

.

effigy / instrument / ecstasy / bandages,

the curtains closing, burning away…

Kimberly inhabits some dead Emily Dickinson

.

as a cavity digging its own burial

in the calcium, fingering the

sweetener, peeling cigarette into pen…

.

As malignant as intelligence,

the audience metastasizes;

as trustworthy as vasectomy,

.

some dumb dope Jesus of Nazareth

crossed with a Kalashnikov,

cuddly with the celluloid, counting down

.

three / three / two / one, singling

each throb out, and each beat’s ghost, dent,

and each sonar blip of childhood

.

stitched out into the belly of oblivion,

saturation of flap in rosy flag, uselessly

an invitation for Kimberly away

.

into bedroom / surgery / photo booth /

bedroom, penned in in the dreamfarm,

god locked up into gardener,

.

cutlery beat into ornament,

and a wet steak used as a tombstone

/ headboard / ringtone / agonist

.

to wherever serotonin wants to sink,

affluent enough to delve fire and breathe,

toasted enough to stink, she bows.


Donald Dunbar

Series Entry 14.3


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”


Michael Matchen

Series Entry 14.4


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”

It’s one thing to be above it all

It’s another thing to be torn out of it

And stuck dangling to the skyhook

.

It’s one thing to be hiding your wounds

It’s one thing to be dying of your wounds

It’s something to only suffer, suffer, suffer, suffer

.

It’s easier

When you’re not crushing its throat

It’s easiest when it’s already dead

.

It’s called “Passive Loss”

It’s called “The Candle Inside the Throat”

It’s calling us back to the surgery

.

It’s a name, it’s poison, it’s a scalpel

It’s Kimmy locked in a sarcophagus

It’s a first taste of real magic

.

It’s an execution

It’s execution-style ornamentation

It’s cold, it’s so

.

Cold, he says,

Bleeding out all over your sun dress

It’s so personal it’s your throat getting crushed

.

It’s so precise it’s your throat getting crushed

It’s simple

It’s as stupid as physics, as ethical as a hammer

.

It’s a hammer swinging down on the pin

It’s writhing like a worm in the center of her brain

It’s another thing you hadn’t known to fear

.

It’s an esophagus trisected into song

/ swallow / surgical performance

It ends in a meat locker, dimly lit

.

By a fluorescent tube, twitching to each moan

It’s Kimmy’s ghost leaking from the coffin

It ends with ghosts pooling in the drain


Donald Dunbar

Series Entry 14.5


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”


Michael Matchen

Series Entry 14.6


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”

No longer Kimberly, Kimberly comes.

The selfless eyes and the curve of their cusp.

In her disfigurement, Kimberly lows.

In her performance she unsubscribes.

In her performances curtains exhale

a weight of air as molten as gold,

as game as meat in her neck on my chest,

as in, concentric homes, colorful bells.

Behavior muddled with copper and jolt.

And in occlude of her iris, eclipse

of salt in water and saturation of felt.

The logic shedding its bulb to its spine.

The slow blossom of breath in the phone.

In her room, the slow blossom of breath.


Donald Dunbar

Series Entry 14.7


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”


Michael Matchen

Series Entry 14.8


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”

out of aorta into rope (wire) throb
of opium swabs her veins of
video (clean) a trumpet’s swim
in tidal hemoglobin (ocean hiss

inhabiting even her heart) thirst
for a throat of honey (calling
out from under the film) muzzled
(the embers collude) in orgasm

(ceaseless) the world (eludes rot)
word (to song) to ashes (the body
has only one war) leaking iris
(a surgeon deprived of words) a

more pure reason (cleaning the
scalpel in my breathing) sleeping
(freezing) serving (I wait here)
chloroformed (for the return of

the wind) and even in a wonderful
place (still I’m weightless)


Donald Dunbar

Series Entry 14.9


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”


Michael Matchen

Series Entry 14.10


Description

Series_14

Donald Dunbar & Michael Matchen

Innovative play with audio textures provides a stage for new voices and reinterpretations in Series 14. Donald Dunbar’s reeling poetry starts off the series exchange by offering a firestorm of juxtaposed everyday references and subtle charges of sneering commentary about the performative aspect in all social and inter-self encounters. Michael Matchen, in turn, remixes the recorded readings of Dunbar’s poetry to create original, if wholly responsive sonic compositions honing in on discovered human rhythms, or the “antidote in the babel”. As the series evolves, voices fuse with what they describe, and vice versa. Serving as both hyper-interpretative filters of their surroundings and, ironically as a result, purely aesthetic vehicles, the employed characters struggle to locate some salvageable definition of the indivisible/individual in the encountered miasmatic intersections of unstable form and exploited function; hacked body and hive mind. As Donald Dunbar writes of a recurring figure in the entries named Kimberly, she negotiates an invitation “into bedroom / surgery / photo booth / bedroom, penned in in the bedroom.” And, as further revealed by Michael Matchen’s audio compositions gradually evolving from buzzing cacophonies into machine echoes and harmonies, the initially protean, animalistic existence ‘penned in’ by contemporary life gives way to something accepting of perpetual transition and translation—a study of movement from flesh bits and cultural detritus to an embodied, if ethereal voice coded into “the slow blossom of breath in the phone.”