Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.1


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

I might not vanish, for you, the second I am out of your immediate sensory range, and I love that, I love how we could choose fear, but do not, and I love how we could have chosen to leave the basement at once, and did, though we couldn’t go too far southeast for awhile, past that green corner where the bridge is, finally, more interesting to look at than the water, curving along the golf course, a territory of possibility we didn’t yet need to claim. The things that happen to our bodies are real. Too late we went to see the rhododendrons, which had already bloomed and dropped, but we were almost in love again. The trunks were smooth and perfect with life. The blossoms that remained looked leftover from an impoverished, tea-stained past, beautiful, like poppies, fascinating to observe at every stage of their life cycle. You and you youth obsession, I said, and meant it. Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.  


Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.2


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.


Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.3


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

COMPARISON IS THE BASIS OF ALL KNOWLEDGE & ALL REASONING

.

The drinking water reservoir

has to move indoors so people and animals

can’t pee in it. The mountains I love are younger

and taller than me by one inch. I take my whole

burning skin down to basement, give my throat

a pillar. Without desire there is hope. I come

right to the spot. Get well. I would spend seventeen

years creating a pond for you to rise from.

I’d maintain moonlight, cool clinging shorts.

  


Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.4


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.


Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.5


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

In the desert all I ever wanted was to be in love

 

and asleep. The threat of love hung

 

over the morning I ran out of oil

 

and for the first time fried an egg in butter.

 

I knew I had maybe six good miracles left.

 

Every time I said I missed the rain he rolled

 

a single pearl to me across our blue table.

 

Retreats to the mountain lake house

 

where bare and sandaled feet padded

 

past a rattlesnake until some drunker uncle

 

used a shovel to behead it. A death was never

 

a surprise. At night I’d put on a sweater

 

and walk out to the sand’s lacy salt edge

 

where I knew the moon was mine, and there

 

I’d remember a snowball shattering the pane

 

of an antique lantern, the orange glow spilled

 

out. I’d think of trees, growing.


Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.6


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.


Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.7


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

I want to thank you for being so

thoroughly gone. Did you need me

to talk about how bad our country is

at death? I remember the teenage actors

trying to scare me in the cemetery

the choral singing, an owl perched

on a volunteer’s arm at the end

a curl of supermoon melting away

mornings I would flee the bad-smelling bed

a group of old men in the coffee shop were shitty

to a woman in ways they think of as kind

my voice coming now from inside a tube

of dead hornets, a metal tubful of oil

cracked and leaking underground

sometimes it matters when people know

I’m annoyed, green light dragging

through the seasons

an army of sex toys buzzing

maybe that’s the reason

I want my friends to have kids

so I don’t have to share

sometimes did you ever sneak a piece

of my cold butter into your mouth


Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.8


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.


Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.9


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

In my dream I was a brave fall dahlia
meticulously bloomed
and after that the last living lion
growing death’s heavy gold coat
The morning rained light like a saltwater fish tank
Yellows and reds flat from the strain of glowing
A low fast layer of clouds flung across the river
You, sealed alive inside a black valley
Me, a steaming black mountain
Embers of real care throbbed in the wind
I was ready for the world to be enough

Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.10


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.


Merritt Zella

Series Entry 24.11


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.

GHOST STORIES
.
It’s that time of night when I hear something.
Today is Singles Day in China.
In China the villagers grew very tired and heard a voice.
Lie down, lie down on this hill forever.
Even some tourists did.
Have you ever unleashed a full-on terror scream?
Eventually you come to that interlude where you have to explain what ghosts do.
Ghost sex, ghosts beginning to hide their beauty.
Pink liquid dripping from the ceiling is how the neighbors knew.
It was surprisingly exhausting, riding a snowmobile for hours into the blank.
Then a trio of black dots emerging: eye, eye, nose.
It’s not a story anyone lives to tell.
 The white face laughing up the stairs.
Organ in the hall, vibrating.
The moved toothpaste.
At first I looked like a man walking in place on the sand.
Like standing still with all of my bones breaking at once.
I’m the same temperature as the air.
A bureau scraping through the attic.

Tyler Brewington

Series Entry 24.12


Description

Series_24

Merritt Zella & Tyler Brewington

To speak of death is to not. This is the paradox with which we all live on a daily basis. Series 24 featuring the collected work of Tyler Brewington (poetry) and Merritt Zella (photography / video) explores this condition through an examination of shifting recollection, illusion, and quotidian detail. As one of Brewington’s pieces observes, “the trunks were smooth and perfect with life […] Five faltering blossoms opened at once. We could quiet one of them, but the other four were still there.” Death becomes playfully indivisible from a common mottle of whack-a-mole lives. The series settles into the implications of this idea over the span of 12 entries that somehow both drift aimlessly and carry tinges of inevitability throughout. Both artists seem attuned to the realization that the words, images, and actions we employ to express death actually imbue the concept with more desperate and comically persistent life.